#BrooklynConnectedQAL – Fabric Selection

I hope you’ve decided to join our virtual quilt-along, hosted by the Brooklyn Quilters’ Guild ! This video is all about fabric selection. What a great opportunity to go through your stash and start using some of those beautiful fabrics you’ve been collecting! Be sure to post pics on Instagram and Facebook and use the hashtag #BrooklynConnectedQAL. And follow that hashtag so you can see everyone else’s posts. Find the written pattern instructions on Barbara Danzi’s blog. Be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel so you don’t miss any of my upcoming demos. And please leave questions and comments and advice in the Comments section. This is all about staying connected as a community even if we’re all self-quarantining right now.

#BrooklynConnectedQAL – Introduction

In this time of social distancing and self-quarantining, the Brooklyn Quilters’ Guild is hosting a virtual quilt-along. Watch the video below to learn all about it, and please join us! As you start putting your blocks together, be sure to post pics on Instagram and Facebook and use the hashtag #BrooklynConnectedQAL. And follow that hashtag so you can see everyone else’s posts. Find the written pattern instructions on Barbara Danzi’s blog. I’ll be posting demo videos throughout. Be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel so you don’t miss any of them!

BMQ YouTube Series: Episode 5 – Unboxing Video from Connecting Threads

I’ve posted a new video on my YouTube channel! This is my first unboxing video. Ooh! I took full advantage of the latest clearance sale at Connecting Threads, so join me as I reveal my new treasures. Please subscribe so you don’t miss out on any upcoming videos, and be sure to leave any questions or comments here or on my YouTube channel so we can keep the quilting conversation going!

BMQ YouTube Series: Episode 4 – Ryan

My latest YouTube video is up! I sit down with Ryan Migge and discuss his creative journey and what he does to get over those roadblocks that keep us from finishing our projects. As always, I’d love to hear from you, so please leave any comments or questions on my YouTube channel or contact me through my website. And be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel so you don’t miss out on any of my upcoming interviews!

BMQ YouTube Series: Episode 3 – Rainbow Chevron Tablerunner

My latest YouTube video is just me talking about my quilting process for my latest project, which is this quick-and-easy chevron tablerunner using 2.5″ precut strips of Dit Dot Evolution fabrics. Enjoy the video and be sure to click on Subscribe so you don’t miss out on any future posts!

A New Year, A New Decade, A New Experiment!

Happy 2020, everyone! I hope everyone had a wonderful time celebrating the various winter holidays these last few weeks. My way of welcoming in 2020 was to purchase my own copy of Interaction of Color by Josef Albers. It’s a highly regarded text on color theory, and I’m planning on creating a series of mini quilts based on the exercises within the book. I’m excited to get started!

BMQ YouTube Series: Episode 2 – David

In my second YouTube episode, I sit down with my friend David and discuss his creative process and the importance of expressing your creativity no matter what you do for a living. Watch the video to find out the wide variety of outlets David uses to express his creativity. I’d love to hear from you, so please leave any comments or questions on my YouTube channel or contact me through my website. And be sure to subscribe to my YouTube channel so you don’t miss out on any of my upcoming interviews!

My Christmas Tree Skirt

My Christmas tree is the most beautiful Christmas tree in the world. Many people disagree. They are wrong. I was born and raised in Toledo, Ohio, which is the Glass City due to its history of glass manufacturing for the past several decades. Luckily, that means there are amazing glass artisans throughout the area, and the Toledo Museum of Art houses one of the most impressive glass collections in the world. Many years ago, my mom began gifting my siblings and me with a glass ornament each Christmas, so I have an AMAZING collection at this point and I am deeply in love with each and every one.

One of the most beautiful characteristics of glass ornaments is the way they interact with light. Because of this, I decided I wanted a tree that allowed the natural sunlight to fully shine through them during the day and the Christmas tree lights to cause the ornaments to twinkle at night, which meant I wasn’t interested in a traditional tree with pine needles that would block the light. After MUCH searching, I finally found the perfect tree — a simple birch-style tree with built-in lights at the tip of each branch. I truly love how my ornaments shine and sparkle hanging from this tree.

This is all a very long build-up to explain how I came about creating my Christmas tree skirt. One of the ornaments my mom gave us a few years ago was a fused-glass star, which I use as my tree topper. It’s super modern and colorful and awesome, and it inspired me to create an improv-pieced tree skirt using up some of the billions of scraps I’ve collected over the last few years of quilting.

Because I have a very non-traditional tree, I decided I wanted a very non-traditional skirt. I really love Justin Stafford’s Squareburst quilt, and I thought a square tree skirt would work really well with my tree. So I took some of the craft paper that’s been used as packaging and that I save for moments like this. I decided on the size and drew out the pattern. I then cut it all up to use as templates.

Then I had to go through all of my scraps and sort them by color. That was a process. Oy. However, it was necessary and made the piecing process so much easier. I wanted to use all of the colors that are on my tree, which is pretty much everything, so I decided on red, orange, yellow, chartreuse, green, blue, purple, and pink.

I set up my improv piecing station, consisting of my Martelli Round-About Cutting mat and Rotary Ergo cutter on one side of my sewing machine and my ironing board on the other. At that point, it was just a matter of sewing, pressing, and slicing, sewing, pressing, and slicing, sewing, pressing, and slicing, over and over again in each of the colorways until I had pieced enough scraps to fit with the triangular template.

The trickiest part of this tree skirt was binding the center hole. I have never sewn a curved binding before, so I needed to look up a few different YouTube tutorials to figure it out. Other than that, everything went together pretty quickly and easily, resulting in what I think is a pretty darn gorgeous Christmas tree skirt!

This will most likely be my last blog post of 2019 as I will be traveling to the Glass City in a couple of days to visit my family for the next couple of weeks. Happy holidays to all and have a very happy new year!!

Creating a Quilt: Part 7 – The Finishing Touches

All right, folks! If you’ve been following my “Creating a Quilt” series, you’ve seen my process from thinking of an idea all the way up through the quilting design. There are only a few details left, but I assure you they’re just as important as all of the rest!

First, I need to trim off all of the extra batting and backing and square up the whole quilt. When I square up a quilt, I try to find some element of the quilt that I can use to measure with that will get me an even trim around the whole quilt. In this case, I used the outer black border. I then place the largest square ruler I have in one of the corners of the quilt, line it up so I’m cutting off an even amount on both sides, and trim up the right-hand side of the ruler and then over the top. Then I use my long 24″ ruler to continue the cut all the way to the next corner.

I tend to switch between my long ruler and my square ruler, but you could just as easily use your long ruler all the way around once you’ve decided on the amount you want to trim. Ideally, I trim as little of the actual quilt top as possible while still making sure that no batting will be seen once I attach the binding.

Speaking of binding, that’s the last important design decision that must be made. Actually, before even deciding what kind of binding you want, you need to decide if you want to actually bind your quilt or use a facing instead. Binding a quilt is definitely the most common way to cover up the raw edges of a finished quilt, especially quilts that you want to snuggle under. A binding creates a lovely frame around your quilt top while making sure all of your raw edges are securely enclosed. Depending on what kind of fabric or print you choose for your binding, it can either blend in or really pop out.

I’ve also used facing for several of my quilts, though usually for quilts that are meant to hang on walls. When you face a quilt, you basically pull the raw edges over to the back and cover them with a different kind of binding that won’t be seen on the front. This gives the quilt a frameless look. I really love facing my quilts when I want the viewer to imagine my quilting designs continuing off of the quilt.

In the case of this quilt, I had already decided to add the black outer border as a solid frame, so I decided a simple black binding that blended in would be the perfect way to finish it. I generally machine sew the binding onto the front of the quilt and then hand stitch it to the back. I really love how it looks on both sides when I use that technique.

Once the last stitch of the binding has been sewn, I usually consider my quilt D-O-N-E. However, when a quilt is going to be displayed, it needs a couple more elements added to it — a hanging sleeve and a label. There are different ways to display your quilt, so if you’re entering your quilt in a show be sure to read the guidelines for how that particular show wants you to attach a hanging sleeve. I went ahead and used some more scraps from my quilt to construct this hanging sleeve. I like how it kind of blends into the back, though I don’t always care so much about that since it won’t normally be seen by anyone.

As for the labels, I like to make mine by hand. I include the name of the quilt, my name, my social media handle, my location, and the date the quilt was completed (I just use the month and year). Because I’m not selling my quilts at this point, I’m not too worried about how professional my labels look. I’m kind of digging the homemade vibe they have right now.

One thing you may remember from one of my earlier “Creating a Quilt” posts is that I was planning on calling this quilt “Dear Brooklyn,” as an homage to the Dear Jane quilt pattern. However, as I started actually making the quilt, I realized my quilt really looked nothing like a Dear Jane quilt and instead my blocks looked more like Polaroid snapshots. So one of the last design decisions I made was to change the name to “BK Snaps.”

And now my quilt is officially finished. Huzzah! I really loved the entire process of creating this quilt, and I’m so glad you came along on the journey with me. I’d love to hear about your own quilt-creating process or any sort of creative process you use whenever you’re crafting anything. Please leave comments or questions in the Comment section below, so we can all learn from each other and continue to thrive as a creating community! Happy crafting!!

BMQ YouTube Series: Episode 01.5 – Shannon

Because I started my YouTube series with a different concept, I have posted the second half of my interview with Shannon Reed who learns to sew piping around an envelope-backed pillow. Check it out to see how it turns out, and please subscribe to my channel so you don’t miss out on any future videos!